fbpx
In The News

Moving Traditions in the news.

eJewishPhilanthropy

To help teens navigate antisemitism, we must teach compassionate disagreement

By Jennifer Anolik, eJewish Philanthropy
So, how can we as Jewish educators and adults—who may be overwhelmed ourselves—help teens in this moment? One important element in a supportive and compassionate conversation about Israel and antisemitism is the cultivation of a safe and brave space. Moving Traditions teen groups, Rosh Hodesh, Shevet, and Tzelem all prioritize this: an atmosphere in which teens are valued, respected, and encouraged to share a diversity of thoughts and feelings.

Continue Reading →


Zoom-Mitzvah 101: A Guide

By Sarah M. Seltzer, Lilith Magazine
April 26, 2021

If you’re one of the many Jewish parents,  clergy, or educators trying to reimagine bar or bat mitzvah celebration on a screen, Moving Traditions staff has you covered, with help for creating a meaningful Zoom Mitzvah in the age of the coronavirus. Download the free guide at movingtraditions.

Continue Reading →


New guide offers tips for ‘Zoom mitzvahs’

By Amanda Koehn, Lifestyles Magazine Editor, Cleveland Jewish News
May 26, 2021

Moving Traditions, an organization to inspire Jewish youth toward self-discovery and learning, early this year released a guide to creatively celebrating a bar or bat mitzvah during the pandemic.

“Zoom-Mitzvah 101: A Moving Traditions Guide to Thinking Creatively About Pandemic B’nai Mitzvahs” aims to address the question, “How do we celebrate a b’nai mitzvah online and still make it joyous, authentic and meaningful?”

Continue Reading →


Moving Traditions Founder and CEO to Step Down Next Year

By Andy Gotlieb, Jewish Exponent
May 20, 2021

Moving Traditions co-founder and CEO Deborah Meyer announced that she is stepping down at the end of March 2022.

“Together, for more than two decades, and during the challenging last 14 months, we have nurtured the wellbeing, resilience and compassion of more than 28,000 Jewish youth, within Jewish community,” Meyer wrote. “We have trained and coached more than 2,200 adults to mentor youth.”

Continue Reading →


Zoom-mitzvahs moving the bar on tradition – comment

By Howard Blas, Jerusalem Post
One year ago, no one had ever heard of a Zoom bar or bat mitzvah. They now rival Zoom weddings, baby namings, brisses, funerals and shivas as the most popular online Jewish rituals to attend during a pandemic. Zoom bnai mitvahs may be the only ritual with research and best practices, thanks to Moving Traditions and their Zoom-Mitzvah 101: A Moving Traditions Guide to Thinking Creatively About Pandemic B’nai Mitzvahs guide.

Continue Reading →


Fund for the Future continues to fuel innovation

Better serving day school students with learning differences.

Connecting Judaism to LGBTQ+ teens’ process of self-discovery.

Helping Jewish and interfaith new parents build community and engage in Jewish life.

These are among the innovative initiatives supported by the most recent round of distributions from the Jewish Federation’s Fund for the Future, which is devoted to accelerating the community’s investment in Next Generation Jewish engagement.

The $550,000 in distributions, made in November 2020, bring total Fund for the Future disbursals to nearly $5 million to date.

Continue Reading →


Novel ideas to celebrate bar/bat mitzvahs during continued COVID restrictions

 As the coronavirus pandemic continues to keep Jewish services and life-cycle events smaller in size, many Jewish families are grappling with letting go of long-held expectations about the bar or bat mitzvah celebration they imagined for their child.

To that end, Moving Traditions has published a new guide to facilitate the transition.

Continue Reading →


Learning from Grantee-Partners: A Series on Insights from Leaders in the Field

By Jim Joseph Foundation
December 10th, 2020

While the field of Jewish education and engagement today sees building mental health as essential, Moving Traditions has been pioneering this approach for 16 years. Two key learnings that deeply inform its work today are the ideas that:

  • Resilience is at the heart, where social justice and wellness intersect. When teens work for change, they reduce their stress and build resilience, while also building communities and a society that is stronger and more just. “What’s good for individuals is good for society and the wider world,” adds Deborah.
  • Building “members” of society is necessary and important work. In addition to leadership development, Moving Traditions strives to develop engaged citizens, active “members” of their community. Skills needed to be an active member, such as empathy, communication, and navigating differences are taught in its teen groups, Rosh Hodesh, Shevet, and Tzelem.

Continue Reading →